Semi-professional baker and lifelong cat lady.

All content created, photographed, and eaten by Cody Clark unless otherwise noted.

Catching Elephant is a theme by Andy Taylor.

 

Borscht
I think it’s safe to say this recipe for borscht wouldn’t pass most authenticity tests. I put it together after reading dozens of recipes, and blending them together based on what I had available. This is, of course, the recipe creation process that any cook or baker will go through regularly… except that this time I’d never actually tasted borscht before.
Cooking the vegetables from our farm share is a fun process that usually begins with a quick Google search of “[vegetable] recipes.” Sometimes I find something I may not have come up with on my own, like the cilantro-lime scampi, other times I’m surprised to find my idea for deconstructed spinach lasagna is more unique than I had expected. On this occasion, the research ended with a simple, “Oh, borscht. I’ve heard of that.”
So, here it is. I don’t know how authentically Russian or borscht-like it is, but I can tell you that it’s pretty good.



2 T olive oil
1 small onion (I used a few spring onions)
2 large beets, peeled and chopped
2 carrots, peeled and chopped
4 cups beef broth
1 small potato, peeled and chopped
1 cup thinly-sliced cabbage
2 T chopped fresh dill
2 T red wine vinegar
salt and pepper to taste
sour cream for serving
In a stockpot, heat olive oil and saute onion, beets, and carrots until the onions begin to soften. 
Add beef broth and bring to a boil. Add potatoes, and simmer until vegetables are tender, about 30 minutes.
Add cabbage, continue simmering until cabbage has softened, about 15 minutes.
Remove from heat, add dill and vinegar.
Serve immediately or chill for several hours or overnight. Top with sour cream and more fresh dill, if desired.

Borscht

I think it’s safe to say this recipe for borscht wouldn’t pass most authenticity tests. I put it together after reading dozens of recipes, and blending them together based on what I had available. This is, of course, the recipe creation process that any cook or baker will go through regularly… except that this time I’d never actually tasted borscht before.

Cooking the vegetables from our farm share is a fun process that usually begins with a quick Google search of “[vegetable] recipes.” Sometimes I find something I may not have come up with on my own, like the cilantro-lime scampi, other times I’m surprised to find my idea for deconstructed spinach lasagna is more unique than I had expected. On this occasion, the research ended with a simple, “Oh, borscht. I’ve heard of that.”

So, here it is. I don’t know how authentically Russian or borscht-like it is, but I can tell you that it’s pretty good.

2 T olive oil
1 small onion (I used a few spring onions)
2 large beets, peeled and chopped
2 carrots, peeled and chopped
4 cups beef broth
1 small potato, peeled and chopped
1 cup thinly-sliced cabbage
2 T chopped fresh dill
2 T red wine vinegar
salt and pepper to taste
sour cream for serving

In a stockpot, heat olive oil and saute onion, beets, and carrots until the onions begin to soften.
Add beef broth and bring to a boil. Add potatoes, and simmer until vegetables are tender, about 30 minutes.
Add cabbage, continue simmering until cabbage has softened, about 15 minutes.
Remove from heat, add dill and vinegar.

Serve immediately or chill for several hours or overnight. Top with sour cream and more fresh dill, if desired.

This week’s CSA farm share from Sunseed Farm. Onions, beets, kohlrabi, kale, lettuce, cabbage, tomatoes, cucumbers, jalapeño, zucchini, spring mix, and basil.

I’ve been longing for the day that our farm share contains more than just greens. This selection is absolutely beautiful, which is why it pains me so much to have to say I CAN’T EAT ANY OF IT.

Tuesday I left work early with stomach pain, and spent the night absolutely miserable. Wednesday, I took the day off and walked to Urgent Care to be kinda-sorta-probably diagnosed with gastritis. (In that nothing else seemed to be wrong, so I’ve been told to eat a soft and gentle diet and see what happens.)

Why did I walk to the doctor, you ask? Because Sunday our car broke down and isn’t repairable. I can walk to work, the doctor, the grocery store, etc. In fact, about 99% of our needs are within walking distance. Except the farm. Jesse biked an hour to pick this up today. After biking to and from work.

Send kittens.

Fear not, sweet bun-bun. I shall keep my carnivorous beasts at bay.

I’ve been a member of ClubW's wine club for a few months now, and I think it's time for an official review.

The premise of their wine selections is actually pretty cool. Instead of answering questions about what sort of wines you like (after all, if you’re just starting out, how would you know?) the Palate Profile asks you questions about your tastes in other foods and finds those flavors in wine to make their monthly selections for you. This is a great way to skip past all the information on the bottle you may not otherwise understand until you’ve tasted enough wine to know the difference between French and Spanish, Pinot Gris and Sauvignon Blanc, sweet and dry, etc.

Unfortunately, this concept just did not work for me. (Why am I such a misfit?) I came to ClubW with a pretty basic understanding of wine, but chose not to let my likes and dislikes influence my selections. I filled out the Palate Profile accurately, and let the service do the deciding. After a few months, I started to question why I just didn’t like any of the wines I was receiving, and I started to see the correlation. I like my coffee black, my desserts citrusy, and my food just a bit spicy. Clearly, this was suggesting that I like my wine a bit more rough-and-tumble than I actually do.

Luckily, ClubW also lets you rate wines, and starts to build better recommendations on that. So, after a few months of selecting sweet white wines with flavor notes that could double as a botanical garden, and red wines so jammy you could spread them on toast, I think I’ve finally achieved perfection. I checked my selections this month, thinking I’d have to empty my cart and start over as always, only to find two Rieslings and a red blend.

Bravo, Club-dub. Bravo.

[Full-disclosure: The links above are my referral links. To access ClubW without them, click here.]

(Source: whitewineandcathair.com)